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This series of blog posts will look at each of the major parties’ websites in detail, picking apart their web analytics strategies, design and code. We’ll be going over one website per week, so keep checking our website or subscribe to our Twitter feed to be notified about updates to this series of posts.

Two gunslingers duelling at high noon in front of the polling booth.  Instead of bullets, though, their trick guns have fired out a rod with a banner attached - a banner with the websites of the Liberal and Conservative parties respectively.  Look closer, and you'll see that each gunslinger has the logo of their party on their clothing.

It’s high noon, folks. Harper, Ignatieff, Layton, May – turn around, then walk straight ahead twelve paces. This here’s a showdown!

This week, we take a close look at the campaign website of…

The New Democratic Party of Canada

http://www.ndp.caThe website of the New Democratic Party of Canada.

Google Analytics Performance

The NDP have a sophisticated setup, with separate tracking profile IDs for each of the English (-1) and French (-2) versions of the site, as well as another profile ID that is present on all pages (-3) for overall site tracking.

<!– analytics : english –>
<script type=”text/javascript”>
var _gaq = _gaq || [];
_gaq.push([‘_setAccount’, ‘UA-XXXXXXXX-1’]);
_gaq.push([‘_trackPageview’]);
(function() {
var ga = document.createElement(‘script’); ga.type = ‘text/javascript’; ga.async = true;
ga.src = (‘https:’ == document.location.protocol ? ‘https://ssl’ : ‘http://www’) + ‘.google-analytics.com/ga.js’;
var s = document.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
})();
</script>
<!– analytics : common –>
<script type=”text/javascript”>
var _gaq = _gaq || [];
_gaq.push([‘_setAccount’, ‘UA-XXXXXXXX-3’]);
_gaq.push([‘_setDomainName’, ‘none’]);
_gaq.push([‘_setAllowLinker’, true]);
_gaq.push([‘_trackPageview’]);
(function() {
var ga = document.createElement(‘script’); ga.type = ‘text/javascript’; ga.async = true;
ga.src = (‘https:’ == document.location.protocol ? ‘https://ssl’ : ‘http://www’) + ‘.google-analytics.com/ga.js’;
var s = document.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
})();
</script>

The version of the Google Analytics tracking code used by the NDP is the current asynchronous version, and is correctly placed in the <head> tag according to best practices. The code is properly formed and is not needlessly duplicated.

Advanced Google Analytics cross-domain tracking features are being used on the overall site account (-3) in order to track visits across separate domains (_setAllowLinker and _setDomainName). Correctly, these same features are not being used on the single-version tracking codes (-1 and -2).

Like the Liberal site before it, we were unable to tell whether the NDP were using the E-commerce tracking functions of Google Analytics without making a donation (which we did not do).

Design Performance

The NDP website, when a visitor first arrives, presents an introductory splash page giving visitors ways to stay in touch and receive future campaign updates. Unfortunately, these are not encouraged with strong calls to action, and could potentially represent a missed opportunity. It would be interesting to set up a funnel to see how many people made it past the splash page and onto the actual site, as none of the other parties are using intermediary splash pages as gateways to the full site. Thankfully, the NDP site appears to set cookies or use some other mechanism to record whether or not a particular visitor has already viewed the splash page, and dispenses with it on return visits.

The green “donate now” button among mostly grey and orange design elements provides the NDP with a quickly noticed and simple call to action to support one of the most important elements of a political party’s election campaign: the war chest.

Other calls to action on the page, such as “Read the Platform”, “Meet Your Candidate”, “Watch the Video” and “Get Involved”, are short but compelling, and are easily spotted as these elements, orange buttons with white text, are placed above a grey background.

The main navigation, however, is not structured to compel visitors, reducing itself to single-word descriptions of destinations such as “Home”, “Jack Layton”, “Party”, “Platform”, “News”, etc. While many of these functions are replicated elsewhere with suitable calls to action, it would have been nice to see the strategy carried into the main navigation, as the Liberals had done, even if it meant reducing the total number of options in the navigation bar.

Social media elements just barely make it onto the page above the fold, with only the Twitter widget’s title bar visible. This is enough to show the visitor where they can access NDP’s social media presences, but not enough to facilitate easier access. It would have been much better if social media link icons were placed in the title banner, to the right of Jack Layton’s image. This would have made them more noticeable and might have increased engagement with the NDP by prospective voters.

Code Integrity

The W3C HTML Validator reported 22 errors when the page was validated according to the version declared in the <doctype> tag (XHTML 1.0 Strict). When re-evaluated as HTML5, the errors were reduced to a count of 6 with 2 warnings, suggesting that many of the previous errors were in fact the result of using more advanced code despite using an archaic DOCTYPE declaration.

The NDP website had 26 CSS errors as reported by the W3C CSS Validator when evaluated for compatibility with CSS 2.1. While a few of these errors were connected to the use of more advanced CSS 3 properties, the majority of them seem to indicate a somewhat sloppy treatment of page styling in some areas. We must, however, bear in mind that the NDP site does have five times fewer errors than each of the Conservative and Liberal sites.

The Final Verdict

B

While the Google Analytics implementation, website design and code practices were very competently enacted, and some more sophisticated analytics tracking strategy was employed in the form of separate profiles for English and French versions of the site, the NDP lose some points for low visibility of social media links and inconsistent calls to action.

In the next, and final, entry in the Election Website Showdown we’ll round things up with a look at the oft-forgotten …

Green Party of Canada

http://www.greenparty.caThe website of the Green Party of Canada.

In Part 1, we looked at…

The Conservative Party of Canada

http://www.conservative.caThe website of the Conservative Party of Canada.

In Part 2, we looked at…

The Liberal Party of Canada

http://www.liberal.caThe website of the Liberal Party of Canada.

Stay tuned, and subscribe to our Twitter feed to be the first to hear about updates to this series of posts!

This series of blog posts will look at each of the major parties’ websites in detail, picking apart their web analytics strategies, design and code. We’ll be going over one website per week, so keep checking our website or subscribe to our Twitter feed to be notified about updates to this series of posts.

Two gunslingers duelling at high noon in front of the polling booth.  Instead of bullets, though, their trick guns have fired out a rod with a banner attached - a banner with the websites of the Liberal and Conservative parties respectively.  Look closer, and you'll see that each gunslinger has the logo of their party on their clothing.

It’s high noon, folks. Harper, Ignatieff, Layton, May – turn around, then walk straight ahead twelve paces. This here’s a showdown!

This week, we take a close look at the campaign website of the…

The Liberal Party of Canada

http://www.liberal.caThe website of the Liberal Party of Canada.

Google Analytics Performance

The Google Analytics script is properly situated in the <head> tag according to best practices, and is the proper and current asynchronous version.

<script type=”text/javascript”>//
var _gaq = _gaq || [];
_gaq.push([‘_setAccount’,’UA-XXXXXXX-X’]);
_gaq.push([‘_setAllowLinker’,true],[‘_setDomainName’,’.liberal.ca’],[‘_setAllowHash’, false],[‘_trackPageview’]);
(function() {
var ga = document.createElement(‘script’); ga.type = ‘text/javascript’; ga.async = true;
ga.src = (‘https:’ == document.location.protocol ? ‘https://ssl’ : ‘http://www’) + ‘.google-analytics.com/ga.js’;
var s = document.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
})();
//</script>

The code is properly formed and not duplicated. Furthermore, the Google Analytics tracking code is customized to produce a much more streamlined tracking code that demands less of client-side system resources while doing just as much, if not more.

The Liberals are employing advanced Google Analytics features such as _setAllowLinker, _setDomainName and _setAllowHash to track visits across separate domains as though they were all part of the same domain.

Either they have a very, very bright kid volunteering for them, or they have hired a web development and design firm that knows what they’re doing with Google Analytics
or a separate firm coordinating their analytics strategy. Just about everything is being done right.

Design Performance

Just to the right of the main navigation bar is an easily noticed “Donate Now” button, shaded to appear as though it is rising out of the page. This is a nice, commanding and clear call to action. I’d love to see the Liberal party’s statistics on the donations generated by their website vs. those generated by the Conservatives’ site. It is not known whether they’re using Google Analytics’ e-commerce functions to tack donations, as we would have to make a test donation to expose that code.

Like the donation button, most of the main navigation items are solid calls to action in their own right, and are repeated further down the page under the heading “Make a Difference”.

The Liberals are also taking full advantage of Facebook’s Open Graph meta tags to ensure that when their pages and articles are shared on Facebook, the correct accompanying image, title, description and URL are displayed along with them.

One thing the Liberals may wish to improve on is that they lack a Facebook “Like” or “Share” button closer to the main navigation bar or on individual articles in their sliding “featured items” banner. Currently, these are hidden below the fold in the “Discover the Liberal Party of Canada” section.

The overall layout appears to adhere to best practices, separating the presentational, behavioural and structural layers into CSS, JavaScript and HTML respectively. |

The Liberals could potentially improve their SEO performance, or at least the clarity of their search engine profile, by finding a way to replace text rendered as part of images, especially in their navigation buttons, with ‘real’ text actually embedded in the HTML. Machines cannot read text in images easily, and search engines can’t do it at all.

Code Integrity

The W3C HTML Validator reported 177 errors and 14 warnings when the page was validated as the version declared in the <doctype> tag (XHTML 1.0 Strict). When re-evaluated as HTML5, the errors were reduced to a count of 49, suggesting that many of the previous errors were in fact the result of using more advanced code despite using an archaic DOCTYPE declaration.

The Liberal website had 166 CSS errors as reported by the W3C CSS Validator when evaluated for compatibility with CSS 2.1. On closer inspection, however, many of these errors are in fact due to the use of more advanced CSS 3 properties which are not yet taken into account by the W3C CSS validation tool.

The Final Verdict

A-

The Liberal site does just about everything right as far as Google Analytics is concerned. Some improvements could be made to the overall site design, depending on the party’s objectives and willingness to exploit social media.

The Liberals are, laudably, using more advanced and current code and development principles, opting for more HTML5 and CSS3 integration.

Still, improvements could be made, especially as many of the main navigation items, as well as the party name, are unreadable by search engines because they are rendered as images rather than as real text.

In our next entry for Part 3, we’ll have a look at…

The New Democratic Party of Canada

http://www.ndp.caThe website of the New Democratic Party of Canada.

And in Part 4, we’ll round things up with a look at the oft-forgotten …

Green Party of Canada

http://www.greenparty.caThe website of the Green Party of Canada.

In Part 1, we looked at…

The Conservative Party of Canada

http://www.conservative.caThe website of the Conservative Party of Canada.

Stay tuned, and subscribe to our Twitter feed to be the first to hear about updates to this series of posts!

Recently, we here at PublicInsite began to wonder just how, and how well, each of our major political parties were using their websites to support and augment their election campaigns. Well, now that we’ve had a look at the Conservative, Liberal, New Democratic and Green parties’ websites, we’ve come up with some answers that should shed some light on exactly how each party is handling the rapidly maturing digital medium.

This series of blog posts will look at each of the major parties’ websites in detail, picking apart their web analytics strategies, design and code. We’ll be going over one website per week, so keep checking our website or subscribe to our Twitter feed to be notified about updates to this series of posts.

Two gunslingers duelling at high noon in front of the polling booth.  Instead of bullets, though, their trick guns have fired out a rod with a banner attached - a banner with the websites of the Liberal and Conservative parties respectively.  Look closer, and you'll see that each gunslinger has the logo of their party on their clothing.

It’s high noon, folks. Harper, Ignatieff, Layton, May – turn around, then walk straight ahead twelve paces. This here’s a showdown!

Here in Part 1, we’ll be looking at…

The Conservative Party of Canada

http://www.conservative.caThe website of the Conservative Party of Canada.

Google Analytics Performance

All the Google Analytics page tracking code is situated at the bottom of the page – not a good thing for the newer asynchronous code, which must be placed at the top of the page.

<script type=”text/javascript”> 

var _gaq = _gaq || [];

_gaq.push([‘_setAccount’, ‘UA-XXXXXXXX-1’]);

_gaq.push([‘_trackPageview’]);

(function() {

var ga = document.createElement(‘script’); ga.type = ‘text/javascript’; ga.async = true;

ga.src = (‘https:’ == document.location.protocol ? ‘https://ssl’ : ‘http://www’) + ‘.google-analytics.com/ga.js’;

var s = document.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);

})();

</script>

<script type=”text/javascript”> 

var gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);

document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”));

</script>

<script type=”text/javascript”>

try {

var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-XXXXXXXX-2”);

pageTracker._trackPageview();

} catch(err) {}

</script>

<script type=”text/javascript”> 

var gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);

document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”));

</script>

<script type=”text/javascript”>

try {

var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-XXXXXXXX-2”);

pageTracker._trackPageview();

} catch(err) {}

</script>

There are also two old-style page tags with the same account number – this may result in double-counting of incoming page traffic to that account, verified by examination of the _utm beacons sent to Google Analytics. This is generally not a good thing for accurate data.

The code used here deviates from best practices in that both the old and current versions of the GATC are used on the same page. Best practices indicate that a GA user choose a version of the code and stick with it.

The inconsistent code coupled with the novice mistake of doubling the page tag seem to indicate an amateur job, perhaps an afterthought forced on their web developer near the end of the project. It does not appear that a specialized or competent web analytics firm or expert was consulted by the Conservative party on their tagging and analytics strategy.

Design Performance

There is no clear call to action within the top 600 pixels. Assuming that the Conservative target audience is their traditional supporting demographic of older Canadians, and that these same individuals are not likely to upgrade computers often and/or set their resolutions low (800×600 or 1024×768) purposely for easier reading, this could be a problem. Features to help find local candidates, organize campaign efforts on the “Tory Nation” forum and join the party’s Facebook page are found even further below the fold. This is not ideal. Furthermore, the “Tory Nation” forum is not being tracked in Google Analytics (perhaps because it is supposedly in ‘beta’, according to its logo).

The main nav items are not solid calls to action: they are single words that say very little and certainly do not present actionable recommendations to the user as to what they should view next. The closest the first top third of the page above the fold comes to a call to action is a rather weak “find my candidate” link in the extreme top-right.

They use tables rather than CSS for layout. The last time this was a best practice was the turn of the century – no professional web designer worth their salary or freelancing income would be comfortable with this. Even backward browser compatibility is no excuse for this: CSS support for most of the elements we use today for proper, modern layout began in Internet Explorer 4 and was refined further in Internet Explorer 5 and 6, the latter being the oldest browser still in common use.

Code Integrity

The W3C HTML Validator reported 54 errors and 11 warnings when the page was validated as the version declared in the <doctype> tag (XHTML 4.0 Transitional).

Also, despite not using much of it for proper layout, the Conservatives’ website had 79 CSS errors as reported by the W3C CSS Validator.

The Final Verdict

D

The archaic structure, sloppy code and poor usage of the Google Analytics tracking code blow the Conservatives away here at the P.I. corral. The final nail in the coffin is the chronic lack of clear calls to action that could compel party faithful and undecided voters alike to take action in support of the Conservative party. Will the Liberals fare any better? Drop by next week and find out!

Next week, we’ll have a closer look at the website of…

The Liberal Party of Canada

http://www.liberal.ca

The website of the Liberal Party of Canada.

Week three belongs to…

The New Democratic Party of Canada

http://www.ndp.caThe website of the New Democratic Party of Canada.

And in week four, we’ll round things up with a look at the oft-forgotten …

Green Party of Canada

http://www.greenparty.caThe website of the Green Party of Canada.

Stay tuned, and subscribe to our Twitter feed to be the first to hear about updates to this series of posts!

Note: as this content is time-sensitive, it will be released immediately, rather than being held back exclusively for newsletter subscribers.

This is Part II of How do Visitors Find You?.

Introduction

In part 1 of this blog, we touched on the major benchmarks related to referrer traffic for public sector and non-profit sites. In part 2 we will talk about some of the main reasons why it is important to monitor, at least on a monthly basis, how your traffic is developing and potentially changing over time. We will also look at a great report which is easy to create, and is woth its weight in gold!

The importance of monitoring referral traffic & what should be considered

Web sites are like moving targets; always changing and never perfect despite our best efforts. The most important part of any Website, however, is the audience. This is why it is important to monitor web traffic and your referrers.

Keeping an eye on your referrers will help you:

  • understand where the main sources of traffic are and if and when they are changing;
  • determine whether campaigns (both offline and online) are effective in delivering traffic; in the case of the online campaigns, it’s can also be a good measure to validate that you are paying for proper amounts of traffic (i.e. click fraud); and
  • ensure that major changes to the site and content have not impacted the traffic negatively (we’ve seen updates include technical files such as ‘robots.txt’ files configured to disallowed search engines from crawling the site – and this had a huge negative impact traffic numbers within days).

It is also important to consider the ‘quality’ of the visits rather than the ‘quantity’. As in part 1 of this blog, considering 5 major groups of referrers is far more interesting and revealing than simply looking at the top 20 or 25 referrers. Likewise, it can also be very telling to look at a few core engagement metrics related to each of these groups, rather than simply looking at the total visits.

For example, consider the following two reports and decide which one would be more useful to yourself, your colleagues, and your organization for making appropriate marketing decisions:

Report A: A list of the top 25 referrers and their corresponding visits. Clearly, a large portion of the traffic comes from this list and it will include Google, None, and perhaps a few other interesting sites.
Report B: A list of 6 groups (as identified in part 1 of this blog) with their total visits, total views, the average number of pages viewed per visit, the average visit duration in minutes, and the bounce rate (the percentage of single page visits).

With Report B, a manager would be able to get a much better understanding of how natural search engine results are working relative to Social Media for example. If your organization has committed resources to Social Media initiatives such as Facebook and Twitter, but visits to your site from these efforts are staying 1/4 as long, looking at 3 less pages per visit, and have a high bounce rate than those coming from partner sites, then you would be well advised to consider a COURSE CORRECTION. This example illustrates that the content, landing pages, target audiences, etc. should be reviewed to ensure the messaging is reflective of the audiences using the Social Media channels you’ve chosen to work within. As usual, the evidence you collect about how your visitors are using the online channel should always form the basis of your decisions!

Conclusion

Plan to monitor your referrer traffic on a monthly basis, because this is the “life blood” of your Website. Ongoing monitor will help managers and marketers get a better sense of what is working and what may not be working as well – and it is never too late to make a mid course correction if you find you are heading in the wrong direction.

PublicInsite Benchmarking

We update our data regularly and will be producing a more granular report exclusively for our clients who choose to be involved in this benchmarking program. Participation ensures confidentiality of the data specific to each client, however, provides mutual benefit across all those who participate. If you would like to be part of our benchmarking program and have your site’s data included, please contact Tyler Gibbs at 613-232-8500 x 102 for more information.

PublicInsite Web Analytics Inc.

Contact us to learn more about what PublicInsite can do for you.

A Simple Way to Re-Visualize Your Key Sources of Traffic (Part 1 of 2)

We all know that things change very quickly with respect to the Web. For instance, the way that people find your site has changed a lot. Think of the days when Yahoo was the site of choice for people to do research and find a site that would help them accomplish their goal; whether it was to plan a family vacation or to get forms for income tax filings. In recent months and years, it seems that when we do informal surveys in rooms of 20 or 30 people, virtually everyone raises their hand when asked “who has done a Google search today?”.

What is a Referrer?

Knowing that Google has a huge percentage of the North American and global market share, it shouldn’t be a surprise that it is typically the number one referrer to a Web site. Before talking too much about referrers and some related benchmarks, it’s important to highlight a quick definition. What is a referrer? In its simplest form, a referrer is a Web site which sends traffic to another Web site and can be a search engine, a social media site, a privately run site, a partner site, etc. When a person sits at their computer and enters a search term in to a search engine, a list of results is returned (called a ‘Search Engine Results Page’ or SERP for short). Upon clicking on one of the results, the keyword they entered in the search engine is captured in the server logs as a ‘keyword’ and the site which sent the visitor is the ‘referrer’. For example, when searching in Google for ‘government of canada’, the top listing on the first page is a link to ‘Government of Canada Official Web Site | Canada Site’ which, when clicked, takes the visitor to ‘www.canada.gc.ca/home.html’. In the log data for this Government of Canada Web site, the ‘referrer’ would be tracked as ‘Google’ and the keyword would also be captured as ‘government of canada’.

Who Are Your Top Referrers, and Who Are They Sending To You?

Getting reports on ‘top referrers’ to a site is relatively straight forward and is a standard out of the box report from Web analytics tools such as WebTrends, NetInsight, Omniture, Google Analytics, etc. It is common for clients to ask for the top 10 or top 20 referrers, and while we can provide that, we prefer to provide them information which is far more valuable; referrer groupings with benchmark data. Rather than looking at the top referrers, usually out of curiosity more so than for practical decision making, we group referrer traffic in to the following major categories (listed with their benchmark values):

  1. Google – without question, Google deserves a category of its own. Across the sites we studied (which will be summarized at the bottom of this blog), we see that Google makes up 37.7% of the traffic. On the low end, some clients receive about 23.1% from Google while on the high end they can receive as much as 57.8%. Sites on the high end of this benchmark are traditionally extremely well search engine optimized.
  2. None – at 29%, this reflects traffic which comes direct to the site (i.e. the visitor knows the URL), they click on a link in an email signature or email newsletter, their session on the site times out and they visit yet another page (i.e. they do not view a page on the site for at least 30 minutes while doing other things on their computer), they frequent a site and therefore have it bookmarked in their browser, etc. Depending on the type and frequency of any branding exercises and outreach campaigns, this can vary from a low of 19.7% to a high of 37.4%.
  3. Other Search Engines – when combining all other search engines and directory services such as Yahoo!, Bing, MSN, Ask, and so on, cumulatively they represent just a fraction of Google. Overall, one can hope to get about 3.8% from all other search engines, but shouldn’t be too concerned if they are near the low end of 2.5% and should be thrilled if they achieve above the high end around 5.2%.
  4. Social Media – this is a hot topic recently with many clients and an important type of referrer traffic to monitor. Whether your organization is actively pursuing social media campaigns or not, others may be blogging, tweeting, or sharing information about your organization online. At 0.4%, this can be easily impacted by external activities or issues, such as the H1N1 virus or political uncertainty leading in to an election. At equilibrium, this can be as low as 0.1% (usually for sites with no social media strategies) and at times of heavily debated issues, as high as 1.1% (typically for sites with an active social media strategy).
  5. Other Web sites – all other sites that are not included in the 4 categories above can be easily combined in to a single grouping. Ranging from a low of 16.8% to a high of 38.1%, this section represents a relatively significant piece of the big picture and averages about 29.2%. It’s important to note that this could be literally tens of thousands of sites, however, by process of elimination from the aforementioned categories, it involves simple math to calculate this percentage.
  6. A sixth and final grouping of referrers could be considered on a site by site basis to reflect partners, likeminded organizations, etc. For example, a Government of Canada site may be interested in creating a group to reflect all traffic which is referred from other Government sites, including municipal, provincial and federal. If this sixth grouping were created for a site, it may steal a small fraction (likely below 5%) from the ‘Other Web sites’ grouping.

As we can see from this data, Google is a predominant source of traffic for the Web sites analyzed. Given the size of the data set, we believe this trend would be similar for most other sites similar in nature to those in this study (i.e. Government Web sites). Given this trend, we strongly support that clients search engine optimize their content to meet the needs of Google, first and foremost, while also considering other avenues for traffic generation (i.e. links on partner Web sites, Pay-per-click campaigns, etc.).

Now that we’ve touched on some major benchmarks with respect to referrer traffic, part 2 of this blog will outline some of the major reasons why it is important to understand this aspect of your site.

Data Summary

The data within this blog was derived by analyzing several Web sites from within our client base. Cumulatively, the data set consists of over 200 Million visits and 1.2 Billion page views and ranges from January 2007 through December 2009. The data was considered on an annual basis and future efforts will be invested to creating similar benchmarks on a monthly basis. Clearly, when analyzing this data on a more granular level, such as weekly or monthly, these numbers would potential have much greater ranges and we will be pursuing this research to include in the near future.

Resource Links

For a more elaborate definition of a ‘referrer’: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Referrer.

PublicInsite Benchmarking

We update our data regularly and will be producing a more granular report exclusively for our clients who choose to be involved in this benchmarking program. Participation ensures confidentiality of the data specific to each client, however, provides mutual benefit across all those who participate. If you would like to be part of our benchmarking program and have your site’s data included, please contact Tyler Gibbs at 613-232-8500 x 102 for more information.

Web Site Benchmarking

Election Website Showdown 2011: Part 3

Cardinal Path blog post

Now we’re putting the NDP in the hotseat in Part 3 of our Election Website Showdown. Read on and find out how they did. Read Full Post

Election Website Showdown 2011: Part 2

Cardinal Path blog post

It’s the Liberals’ turn under the microscope as we continue our Election Website Showdown. Come and take a close look at their website with us. Read Full Post

Election Website Showdown 2011: Part 1

Cardinal Path blog post

Conservatives get a Google Analytics and usability audit to kick off our Election Website Showdown. Let’s find out how conservative their website really is. Read Full Post

A Simple Yet Effective View of Your Traffic Sources

Cardinal Path blog post

This is Part II of How do Visitors Find You?. Introduction In part 1 of this blog, we touched on the major benchmarks related to referrer traffic for public sector and non-profit sites. In part 2 we will talk about some of the main reasons why it is important to monitor, at least on a … Read Full Post

How Do Visitors Find You?

A Simple Way to Re-Visualize Your Key Sources of Traffic (Part 1 of 2) We all know that things change very quickly with respect to the Web. For instance, the way that people find your site has changed a lot. Think of the days when Yahoo was the site of choice for people to do … Read Full Post

Benchmark Your Marketing Analytics Maturity

See how your marketing analytics performs against thousands of organizations. (Approx. 5 minutes).